~ rhythm guitar / styles ~

'be the motor ... :)

'from children's songs and folk into bluegrass, country and the blues, on through to reggae, rock, hip hop, rap and pop then off to jazz ...'

triad basics

a physical evolution

to double no more ...

... and now the colors beyond

In a nutshell. The six string guitar is a musical instrument that gets us a drum, a harp and a motor all in one package ! Well, we're the motor actually, in the rhythm motions we bring. Officially termed syncopation, it's our rhythm grooves that motor the harp strings that sit on top of the drum. Rhythm guitar :)

And while there's a lot of variation in the way the drum is built, the six string harp stays the same, fret positions too. So all this is built into a guitar, we strum and hum and bring it all to life.

A rhythm guitarist. If you want to be the driving dance energizer juice in your band, get some of the chords and your rhythm guitar in working order. Potentially right under our fingers and with all today's gear, even the fewest of pitches sets the house to rockin', works on stages from the garage to arena.

Synchopation. An academic term of unparalled depth and powers, the rhythms we play are our own syncopations. Tune up, and with a light pick, begin to master these rhythms on your guitar. Playing all of the six strings gives us a big motor to start, so try this 'G' chord here.

Labeled by style. Keep in mind moving forward that the rhythm we play helps bring the musical style of any song to life.So in playing these rhythms, 'vision up' the story of the song, to get you in the mood Example 1.

 

 

 

 

 

In a nutshell, making the changes. Slang for our chords, we use the phrase 'making the changes' a couple of ways. Here in our rhythm guitar studies, making the changes is making sure the chords of the song we are performing occur in the rights spots in th.

half step
music notation

In a nutshell, follow the vocalist. Slang for our chords, we use the phrase 'making the changes' a couple of ways. Here in our rhythm guitar studies, making the changes is making sure the chords of the song we are performing occur in the rights spots in th.

half step
music notation

Rhythm guitar. Man if you want to drive the band, get some of the chords and your rhythm guitar working. Potentially right under our fingers and with today's gear, even the fewest of pitches set the house to rockin' from the garage to arena. Well, the arena gigs need bigger PA's of course and maybe some lights :)

video

In a nutshell. The six string guitar is an musical instrument that gets us a drum, a harp and motor all in one. Well, we're the motor actually, in the rhythms we bring by setting the strings in motion. Officially termed syncopation, it's our rhythm grooves that motor the harp strings that sit on top of the drum. And while there's a lot of variation in the way the drum is built, the six string harp stays the same, fret positions too. So all this is built into a guitar, we strum and hum and bring it all to life.

In a nutshell, making the changes. Slang for our chords, we use the phrase 'making the changes' a couple of ways. Here in our rhythm guitar studies, making the changes is making sure the chords of the song we are performing occur in the rights spots in th.

half step
music notation
a couple of key things to consider for rhythm guitar.

No pick? Just makes things easier. Wayback some of us used thin cardboard folded over. Didn't last long, like one song depending, but it had the right flexibility to make strumming easier. Once you got it going you'll find the picks you like.

video

Start with a thin light pick. Just makes things easier. Wayback some of us used thin cardboard folded over. Didn't last long, like one song depending, but it had the right flexibility to make strumming easier. Once you got it going you'll find the picks you like.

video

the big four. Start with a light pick. Just makes things easier. Wayback some of us used thin cardboard folded over. Didn't last long, like one song depending, but it had the right flexibility to make strumming easier. Once you got it going you'll find the picks you like.

video

Two; the gallop. Start with a light pick. Just makes things easier. Wayback some of us used thin cardboard folded over. Didn't last long, like one song depending, but it had the right flexibility to make strumming easier. Once you got it going you'll find the picks you like.

video

 

Reggae. Slang for our chords, we use the phrase 'making the changes' a couple of ways. Here in our rhythm guitar studies, making the changes is making sure the chords of the song we are performing occur in the rights spots in th.

wiki ~ one drop reggae
music notation

Bossa nova. If there's any real trick to bossa nova rhythm guitar it's in the ability to stay focused and play

a song's established rhythm uninterupted throughout the body of the song and oits harmonic progression.

step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

half step
music notation

Octaves.

: This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

half step
music notation

Octaves.

: This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

half step
music notation

Comping.

: This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

half step
music notation

Chomping.

: This half step above the tonic is often simply referred to by its numerical designation. Generally we'll use the sharp (#) when ascending away from the tonic and the flat (b) designation when descending towards our tonic pitch. I also call this pitch a blue note, but I'm probably the only one that does.

half step
music notation

Three note blues lick. Just a couple of pitches to bring the blues hue. In 12 bars in 'G.' Example 15.

blues hue
12 bars

 

"The key to the future of the world is finding the optimistic stories and letting them be known."

Grout, Donald Jay. A History of Western Music, p. 10. W.W.Norton and Company Inc. New York, 1960.

 

Aebersold, James and Slone, Ken. Charlie Parker Omnibook. New York: Atlantic Music Corp., 1978. I know this is a troubling stand to take but I felt I had to and as jazz player, I based it on Charlie Parker's compositions in the Omnibook. Find a copy, count the number of tunes, then compare the number of major key to minor key songs. Any real book of popular American song, by a mix of composers, will follow along similar lines in this regard.regard.

 

~ rhythm guitar / styles ~

' be the motor ... :)

' forward motion ... :)

~ 2 ways to go, eliding the bar lines ~

' a 3 note blues riff ... :)

 

Johnson / Sumlin

Greene / Upchurch

Lennon / Richards / Weir / Cobane

if you have a natural affinity for rhythm guitar, meaning you enjoy crearting this part of the aural mix in your musics, chances are you're a song writer too :)

octaves

first chords / open chords / fingerpicking

'A' minor and the gallop rhythm

 

barre chords

walking bass line

chomping chords
boom chuck boom chuck
down down up down
triplets
boom chuck boom chuck
boom chick boom chick
----- sh ----- sh
comping chords / chord substitution
off beat rhythms / chords

advanced rhythm guitar ideas

the chords do not have to follow the written order

chord substitution / rhythm guitar

'from children's songs and folk into bluegrass, country and the blues, on through to reggae, rock, hip hop, rap and pop then off to jazz ...'

 

Synchopation. An academic term of unparalled depth and powers, the rhythms we play are our own syncopations. Tune up, and with a light pick, begin to master these rhythms on your guitar. Playing all of the six strings gives us a big motor to start, so try this 'G' chord here.

Labeled by style. Keep in mind moving forward that the rhythm we play helps bring the musical style of any song to life.So in playing these rhythms, 'vision up' the story of the song, to get you in the mood Example 1.

your story great challenge in rhythm guitar is sticking with the rhythm and beat through a song's chord progression. Each of the styles have their challenges. The trick is to concentrate. And learn our grooves of course :)

bossa nova on

reggae

.

vision up
music notation