~ Acknowledgements ~

'with a little help from my friends ...'

Herman Matlock
Tom Bargelski
Dr. Joyce Honeychurch
Steve Haycox is professor emeritus of history at the University of Alaska Anchorage.

'... energize your own learning in life by stepping boldly into new journeys, challenges and discoveries.'

 

 

Dr. James B. Miller. In this next idea, we create a basic montuno vamp that utilizes the tonic to flat Two motion we find within the Latin styles. We not only readily find this motion within the literature but often improvise such vamps as intro's and outro's in performance. Example 5.

intro / outro
jam vamps

... put in a Hollywood chord there ol'e boy :) In this next idea, we create a basic montuno vamp that utilizes the tonic to flat Two motion we find within the Latin styles. We not only readily find this motion within the literature but often improvise such vamps as intro's and outro's in performance. Example 5.

intro / outro
jam vamps

Kirk Lamberti. In this next idea, we create a basic montuno vamp that utilizes the tonic to flat Two motion we find within the Latin styles. We not only readily find this motion within the literature but often improvise such vamps as intro's and outro's in performance. Example 5.

intro / outro
jam vamps

Dr. George Belden. In this next idea, we create a basic montuno vamp that utilizes the tonic to flat Two motion we find within the Latin styles. We not only readily find this motion within the literature but often improvise such vamps as intro's and outro's in performance. Example 5.

intro / outro
jam vamps

Larry Tutt / 'coffee' chord spelling chart. A very special thanks here to Larry Tutt from my college days at P.S.U.C. Nicknamed 'King Tut' back then, surely an amazing cat all around, Larry is a true king of what is often termed here in Essentials as 'playing through the chord changes.' Larry showed me his chord spelling chart which is passed along here with you. Used all throughout the text, it illustrates the basis of so much good theory. Recent communications with Larry find him polishing to publish his saxophone method while performing regulary with various musical groups on the Eastern Seaboard of the USA. Google Larry Tutt at the 'vtjazz.org to see what he's up to these days.

wiki ~ Plattsburgh State University College
through the changes
chord spelling chart

Stu Schulman. Stu Schulman is a working musician's musician and the real deal. Coming off the road after a couple of decades, he became our music community budda guru during his couple of decades up here in Anchrage, Alaska. Well known as a masterful pedal steel guitarist, surely among the toughest axes' to handle in all our Americana sounds, he's a Tele nut who can make that thing talk the blues and beyond.

Stu brought to our Alaska community musical abilities and professional knowledge of hanging at the 'A' list level for a couple of decades with many of the stars of the 70's and forward while in the lower 48. Having grown up in Queens, NYC, he also has the grit to tell it like it is. So for a couple of decades here, Stu helped to keep all the fish; the big fish and the regular fish, and up and coming fish, all swimming together, consistently making and helping others create memorable music for the locals throughout all of the Alaska community.

Some of us players up here, mostly yours truly, would when speaking in jest, want to enroll an 'errant gigging artist' for a class or two into the 'Stu Shulman School Of Professionalism', where they could get a slice of the 'real deal pie' from the baker himself, ensuring that from that point forward they might know a better way and thus aspire to hang at an elevated level. Blessed with 'other wordly level aural apparatus' (ears), Stu helped many many artists in the studio here in Alaska and beyond to achieve some of their finest recorded moments.

As a recent graduate, I got to attend a full semester at the close of Stu's tenure here during the writing of this book. The 'diatonic three and three', a link at the top of the index menu, is really a part of Stu's philosophy of understanding our music he shared with me, just presented in my own words. This one idea, fully understood in a couple of keys, can become the foundation for a career's worth of creative endeavors and performance, opening a window of understanding your music that can lead to a fruitfull 'musical life' in our Americana musics.

So not just I alone but all who read here can sincerely thank Stu for this contribution and others within the discussions, all learned by his lifelong commitment to making friends and memorable music, by unselfishly sharing his wisdom, insights, histories and 'New Yawk' styled humor with all of us along the way :) (Stu's school is still in 'e' session at sturoomers@gmail.com)

P.S.U.C
through the changes
chord spelling chart

Randy Sutton. A very special thanks to Randy Sutton, who first showed me the magic of making the 'clicks go away.' Standing behind his vibes armed with four mallets, with Franz clicking merrily away, Randy played some blues ideas that were so well placed with the clicks, that that characteristic' snap' simply vanished. To reappear ... between his phrases. That is good time and still is a standard for today.

a metronome

Gary Sloan. Decades ago Mr. Sloan; a master blues harp, band leader, gig booker and entreprenuerial marketing wizard, Sloan came up to me while on the bandstand while I searched in vain for something to say over 12 bars and quipped; 'play primitive man.' Took a while but finally did. The two licks I mastered really really help to start this rebuild process off. I've got some dates coming up with Gary playing bass. I'll post on some of the sessions on Facebook

'Muddy' blues lick
'Elmore James' blues lick
#1
2
#2 / b3
3
4
#4
b5
5
#5
b6
6
b7
7
8
9
#9
-10th
10th
11
#11
12
b13
13
b14
14

15

#15

Footnotes:

(1)Mauleon-Santana, Rebeca. 101Montunos, p. iv. USA Sher Music Co.,Ca. 1999

(1) Isacoff, Stuart. Temperament ... The Idea That Solved Music's Greatest Riddle, p. 40-42. USA Alfred A. Knopf, New York. 2001

(2)Aebersold, Jamey and Slone, Ken. The Charlie Parker Omnibook. New York: Atlantic Music Corp., 1978.

( start here :)