~ chord substitution ~

~ in a nutshell / the basis ~

~ the seven diatonic steps ~

~ motion to Four / motion to One ~

~ diatonic chord inversions ~

~ between the seven diatonic steps ~

~ passing diminished chords ~

~ raise and lower 1 pitch at a time ~

~ half diminished / V7b9 ~

~ all chords eventually become V 7~

~ melodic minor / V7 ~

~ pentatonic five by five by 12 ~

~ that's it :)

:)

In a nutshell. When true that 'variety is spice of life', and that most of us agree, then chord substitution is a spice for our music, that provides an endless variety :) For in our studies here as we'll soon see, we get to organically pursue how one chord becomes another. In doing so they becomes substitutions for one another, 'working' the same ways in the same spots in our songs, yet giving us the chance for something new, something a bit different of hue, and thus a pathway to explore for new coolness. So we're searching here, looking for ways to jazz up the same old same old. Along the way we expand our palettes with new chords and their colors that just someday be that long sought puzzle piece that completes our masterpiece :)

working / chord function
searching
jazz it up
color palettes
composing puzzles

Diatonic chords. When true that 'variety is spice of life', and that most of us agree, then chord substitution is a spice for our music, that provides an endless variety :) For in our studies here as we'll soon see, we get to organically pursue how one chord becomes another. In doing so they becomes substitutions for one another, 'working' the same ways in the same spots in our songs, yet giving us the chance for something new, something a bit different of hue, and thus a pathway to explore for new coolness. So we're searching here, looking for ways to jazz up the same old same old. Along the way we expand our palettes with new chords and their colors that just someday be that long sought puzzle piece that completes our masterpiece :)

working / chord function
searching
jazz it up
color palettes
composing puzzles

In a nutshell. For some reading here, getting started with improvising might be a bit of a challenge but all journeys must start with a first step, so here's a way to begin yours. By using the same notes for building up our melody and chords, we know our pitches will work, using them in making our art is the magic we seek. In our theory we can term this sharing of the same pitches for our melody and chords as 'diatonic, through the tones.' And as we'll see throughout, understanding the musical environment that diatonic creates is a key component to understanding the structure of the art.

 

A bit of improv history. In the jazz styles, which at one time was America's popular or 'pop' music, the historical role of improvisation is quite varied. Initially evolving from the often fully written out 'ragtime' works of the 1880's, of which we have scores and piano rolls for today, we see the emergence of the collective group improv of the dixieland styles of 1900. As things evolved over the next decade or so, from within this group format, we evolve to the featured soloist backed up by a rhythm section. We see this on into the 1920's or so and forward from there, as new 'stars' emerge and the recording business and making records takes off.

Once here, we then begin see the rise of the individual 'star of the show', headlining the bill. Louis Armstrong is among the first of these stars, and leading by example, set the standard for fronting a band, very often as a singer / interpreter of the words of a song followed by an improvised solo based closely on the melody. Backed by various rhythm section combinations, this format helps found our improvisatory Americana version of stating a theme (melody of the song) and then creating variations of it. What starts out as working over a melody will gradually come to include working out ideas from the overall form and harmonic structure of the chosen song. And from the one soloist format to multiple soloists from within the group; horns, bass drums etc.

“You fear the least what you know the most about.”

wiki ~ John Glenn

about 5700 words

"It always seems impossible until it's done."
wiki ~ Nelson Mandela