~ suspensions in music ~

~ in a nutshell ~

~ sing, hum or buzz ~

~ the pedal tone ~ the V7 suspension ~

~ time and gravity ~

~ most common in melody ~

~ most common in harmony

~ sus 4 chords / minor 11th chords ~

~ vocal lines ~

~ vocal lines ~

~ melodic suspensions

~ harmonic suspensions ~

~ sus 4 chords ~

~ 11th chords ~

~ suspensions come from vocal lines ~

~ when ya coming back ~

'suspending the sense of time through tone'

uspending the sense of gravity and forward motion in the music ...'

... creating the sense of forward motion,

of going to somewhere in the music

regardless of whether we ever really get there or not ... '

 

In a nutshell. So what do musical suspensions actually suspend? The tonal gravity between pitches? Yep, that funny sort of feeling we get when we hear some music, and it just seems to be going somewhere, and in good time and measure, we'll arrive :) Add in the 'aural predictability' factor with tonal gravity and we've then the nuts and bolts to build our essential linear spectrum of musical styles. This becomes the view of a theory / understaing empowered 'modern guitarist.'

Back to tamale-ville :) Well the whole suspension tamali is right here before us in this one chart. For while any one note can 'suspend' from another, there's two suspensions that we hear most often. So, got the caution yellow letters up for the 4th and 7th scale degrees. Thinking 'C' major, the pitches are 'F and B.' Interesting that the interval between this is a tritone; a core of our tension and release dynamic easily found in most musics. The 'F and B' part of V7? Yep, same one. This can be the source of the spark that lights the fuse to kaboom; the better understanding your music :) Example 1.

numerical scale degrees
1
2
4
6
root
3
5
7
.
C major scale / Ionian
C
D
2 ~ 1 or 9 ~ 8 up an octave / 2 up to 3 is stepwise
.
.
E
F
4 ~ 3 common with beyond epic power
.
.
.
G
A
6 ~ 5 classic Americana motion
.
leading tone
B
C
by half step to resolution

Motion to Four. Well documented throughout that the author thinks that motion to Four is the basis of motoring it all along. Once there for whatever spell of time, we tend to move it along all. Where to? Back to One? Sure, Four to One is one (the?) most common destination. And if we hold over our root melody note just a wee bit, i.e., suspend it a bit beyond the barline, vwala presto ... 4 ~ 3 suspension.Thus '4' resolves to the 3rd of our tonic major triad. Example 2.

 

If there was to be a 'queen of the melodic suspensions,' 4-3 is a good candidate. Same with Seven going to Eight. By half stepthe whole suspension tamali is right here before our peepers. Like 'jeepers creepers ...' he following discussion is presented the way it was taught to me. It all evolves from the tritone substitution, pehaps the most common of all. Once under the fingers and understood, we simply project its theory from additional start points within a set arpeggio. From there its a matter of taste and style; what's a tastey sub in one style might get us fired in another :) Here's the lick Example 1.

Not knowing a lot of snWhile backwards in some ways, it's cool because it .

whole step
music notation
numerical scale degrees
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
 
C major scale / Ionian
C
D
.
.
.
.
.
.
 
D Dorian
B
E
F
.
.
.
.
.
 
E Phrygian
.
D
G
A
.
.
.
.
 
F Lydian
.
.
F
B
C
.
.
.
 
G Mixolydian
.
.
.
A
D
E
.
.
 
A natural minor / Aeolian
.
.
.
.
C
F
G
.
 
B Locrian
.
.
.
.
.
E
A
B
 
             
G
C
 

In a nutshell. Really the most powerful thing in our local musical universe is the voice. And when those with a voice stand on the 'sus4' over a tonic chord, hair often stands up..

tonal gravity
numerical magic
on the same page

In a nutshell. When we pick one pitch to be the central tone of our music, which creates a sense of home, a feeling of coming to and being at rest in how we sense the music, we then can consider how we gravitate and negotiate all of the other 11 pitches to our chosen pitch. This lone pitch we designate by a letter name as the key of the music of a song such as 'C' major. Just helps to get everyone on the same page.

tonal gravity
numerical magic
on the same page

Once chosen, our letter name pitch also can become One, our tonic and root pitch to build upon. Thus organized, all of our suspensions are easily understood when considered from this numerical perspective. We view suspensions both in the melody and harmony, which winds them right up together tight. Groovy either way, letter names or numbers, their magic is the same.

tonal gravity
numerical magic
2 ~ 1
4 ~ 3
6 ~ 5
h
h
resolutions

~ this could go one pitch, two pitches, three, four etc ~

saints chord melody

~ leading tone ~

saints chord melody

start with V7 D9 / tonic sus Mercy Mercy Mercy Shortnin'

. The modes play giant in improv for those in the theory know. By re-imagining new loops within a loop, each mode becomes a complete parent scale for creating the winning musical trifecta; melody, arpeggios and chords. These combined cover most of what we need.

tuning our notes

6 ~ 5 in octaves a la Wes Sunny Gets BlueMercy Mercy Mercy Shortnin'

. The modes play giant in improv for those in the theory know. By re-imagining new loops within a loop, each mode becomes a complete parent scale for creating the winning musical trifecta; melody, arpeggios and chords. These combined cover most of what we need.

tuning our notes

In a nutshell. The modes play giant in improv for those in the theory know. By re-imagining new loops within a loop, each mode becomes a complete parent scale for creating the winning musical trifecta; melody, arpeggios and chords. These combined cover most of what we need.

tuning our notes

Why suspend the music? The modes play giant in improv for those in the theory know. By re-imagining new loops within a loop, each mode becomes a complete parent scale for creating the winning musical trifecta; melody, arpeggios and chords. These combined cover most of what we need.

tuning our notes

In a nutshell. The modes play giant in improv for those in the theory know. By re-imagining new loops within a loop, each mode becomes a complete parent scale for creating the winning musical trifecta; melody, arpeggios and chords. These combined cover most of what we need.

tuning our notes

In a nutshell. The modes play giant in improv for those in the theory know. By re-imagining new loops within a loop, each mode becomes a complete parent scale for creating the winning musical trifecta; melody, arpeggios and chords. These combined cover most of what we need.

tuning our notes

Delayed resolution. The modes play giant in improv for those in the theory know. By re-imagining new loops within a loop, each mode becomes a complete parent scale for creating the winning musical trifecta; melody, arpeggios and chords. These combined cover most of what we need.

tuning our notes

~ counter point ~

saints chord melody

~ voice leading ~

saints chord melody
susfour

~ suspended fourth ~

saints chord melody

~ flat 7 ~

saints chord melody

~ 2 to 1~

saints chord melody

~ sequencing a suspension ~

after solstice

~ American musical time is always the first example ~
saints chord melody

~ a method for learning to play the guitar ~

'... what it might take to learn to work the magic ... '

~ a method for learning to play the guitar ~

'... what it might take to learn to work the magic ... '

~ a method for learning to play the guitar ~

'... what it might take to learn to work the magic ... '

Go theory evo or historical with video ... theory too ?

Start with rhythm idea / a one and three riff over D- / pentatonic move up the cell in parallel motio,

2nd rhythm idea is "combining octaves chords and melody with "Big Mitch" n

Start w/ open G banjo and triad based ideas

Then blues guitar in the same open G with blue notes.

Find two or three licks.

Transfer to regular six string and find these licks.

Run these licks through different processor sounds to get to the different styles of American music.

Open chords and folk, using a capo too, into bar chords, their eventual reduction into the 5'ths of metal which takes us back to the beginning of it all.

Pop rock, pop is now mostly synth keyboard and sequencing, bossa into jazz by colortones.

based .r open G

Then folk guitar in standard tuning Speareo Stevens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azgpFGZ79P0song

Then rock guitar into metal into open G rhythm and blues / country is a sound

Then jazz guitar chords

Then Charlie Christian

 

Emma Hill

 

. There's really just the one suggestion here in regards to the playing. The student is encouraged to just learn both melody pitches and chords of their chosen music at the same time. This is achieved by simply either playing the chord first then the scale run over it or vice versa, play the line into the chord change. It's easy and fun and things just end up making a lot more sense. Of course this is about practicing and honing one's craft.

. .

.

one or two main ideas about practicing in the following method and as the discussion goes through each style, they come up each time. First is with learning chords and the second is with sounding out the melodies. So ... bored with your own playing? I know I am at times. Cool, you've come to the right place. Fixing boredom can be as simple as checking out something new. Pick and click by style, always an easy way back into the theory of it all :)

open G tuning pitches
triads
electric guitar / styles
electric guitar
we're all students of somebody

Go theory evo or historical with video ... theory too ?

Start w/ open G banjo

Then blues guitar open G

Then folk guitar in standard tuning Speareo Stevens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azgpFGZ79P0song

Then rock guitar into metal into open G rhythm and blues / country is a sound

Then jazz guitar chords

Then Charlie Christian

 

Emma Hill

 

. There's really just the one suggestion here in regards to the playing. The student is encouraged to just learn both melody pitches and chords of their chosen music at the same time. This is achieved by simply either playing the chord first then the scale run over it or vice versa, play the line into the chord change. It's easy and fun and things just end up making a lot more sense. Of course this is about practicing and honing one's craft.

. .

.

one or two main ideas about practicing in the following method and as the discussion goes through each style, they come up each time. First is with learning chords and the second is with sounding out the melodies. So ... bored with your own playing? I know I am at times. Cool, you've come to the right place. Fixing boredom can be as simple as checking out something new. Pick and click by style, always an easy way back into the theory of it all :)

we're all students of somebody

In a nutshell. There's really just the one suggestion here in regards to the playing. The student is encouraged to just learn both melody pitches and chords of their chosen music at the same time. This is achieved by simply either playing the chord first then the scale run over it or vice versa, play the line into the chord change. It's easy and fun and things just end up making a lot more sense. Of course this is about practicing and honing one's craft.

. .

.

one or two main ideas about practicing in the following method and as the discussion goes through each style, they come up each time. First is with learning chords and the second is with sounding out the melodies. So ... bored with your own playing? I know I am at times. Cool, you've come to the right place. Fixing boredom can be as simple as checking out something new. Pick and click by style, always an easy way back into the theory of it all :)

we're all students of somebody

Backing tracks. There's really just the one suggestion here in regards to the playing. The student is encouraged to just learn both melody pitches and chords of their favorite style at the same time. This is achieved by simply either playing the chord first then the scale run over it or vice versa, play the line into the chord change. It's easy and fun and things make a lot more sense.

. .

.

one or two main ideas about practicing in the following method and as the discussion goes through each style, they come up each time. First is with learning chords and the second is with sounding out the melodies. So ... bored with your own playing? I know I am at times. Cool, you've come to the right place. Fixing boredom can be as simple as checking out something new. Pick and click by style, always an easy way back into the theory of it all :)

we're all students of somebody
chords
melodies
chord melodies
metal
folk
blues rock country
pop and jazz

Scales. Scales are learned by plying the pitches on just the one string. This way we get a better view of the interval spaces between the pitches. It's just easier this way to hone in on the key spots ina grouping, the one's that quicky convey one's whereabouts in regards to the music happening at that momentg in time.

. .

. Example 1.

video

Chords. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

video

Country music. While country music is said to be 'three chords and the truth', the more modern electric country guitar is a lot about the guitar tone . Legend has it that when the first Fender tele's came along, country players dug the twang created by the combo of two pieces of wood bolted together electrified by a single coil pickup. . Example 1.

video

Melodies. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

melodies

Melodies. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

melodies

Chord melodies. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

video

Metal. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

folk

Folk style. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

folk

Blues, rock and country style. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

Pop and jazz style. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

Chromatic is the first evolution / used as a cell into jazz. By downbeat we mean the first beat of each measure. In this next melodic sequence of quarter notes, the downbeat is 'accented', meaning it is played a bit stronger and so sounds a bit louder. Example 1.

Review. Here at Essentials, at the core of our American rhythms lives an accented pulse on the 2nd and 4th beats of a measure of 4 / 4 time. We can find this pulse somewhere in every conceivable musical style and their myriad of sub genres. By accenting the 2 and 4, we create a sense of 'pull' away from and towards the downbeat pulse of each measure. It is believed here that in this pulling or stretching of musical time is where the magic of the American swing thing happens.

We can learn to rhythmically swing by singing our melody lines and getting them to capture the essence of our own unique sense of time. We then only have to transfer these ideas to our guitars. Quarter and eighth notes are the swing note values. Even 8th's are perhaps Latin derived and also swing just fine in other styles, although in a bit more of a modern sense perhaps than the traditional 8th note / triplet feel so common of the early Jazzer's of the first half of the last century. And perhaps it's best to simply remember that ...

Silent Architecture
The organic and historical origins of our pitches.
Loops of Pitches
Examining the unbreakable loop of our pitches.
Groups of Pitches / Evolution of Scales
Examining the Yin / Yang our our musical system.
Major / Minor tonality Our groups become our musical scales.
Evolving Scales into Arpeggios
How our scales become arpeggios.
Evolving Arpeggios into Chords
How our arpeggios become chords.
Evolution of Tuning Tuning of pure pitch into modern musical tones.

I'm always thinking about creating. My future starts when I wake up every morning ... Every day I find something creative to do with my life.

Miles Davis
Footnotes:

(1) Isacoff, Stuart. Temperament ... The Idea That Solved Music's Greatest Riddle, p. 40-42. USA Alfred A. Knopf, New York. 2001

(2)Aebersold, Jamey and Slone, Ken. The Charlie Parker Omnibook. New York: Atlantic Music Corp., 1978.

'It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing ...'

Duke Ellington

~ suspensions in music ~

~ in a nutshell ~

~ the V7 suspension ~

~ time and gravity ~

~ melodic suspensions ~

~ harmonic suspensions

~ sus 4 chords / minor 11th chords

~ vocal lines ~

~ vocal lines ~

~ melodic suspensions

~ harmonic suspensions ~

~ sus 4 chords ~

~ 11th chords ~

~ suspensions come from vocal lines ~

~ when ya coming back ~

'suspending the sense of time through tone'

uspending the sense of gravity and forward motion in the music ...'

... creating the sense of forward motion,

of going to somewhere in the music

regardless of whether we ever really get there or not ... '